Assessing Curricular Competencies

  • Demonstrate a sustained intellectual curiosity about a scientific topic or problem of personal, local, or global interest
  • Make observations aimed at identifying their own questions, including increasingly abstract ones, about the natural world
  • Formulate multiple hypotheses and predict multiple outcomes

How can this skill be demonstrated?

  • By creating intelligent hypotheses for labs – adding new elements to test the effect
  • By asking questions in class that show an understanding and curiosity of the experiment/project

What does extending look like?

  • The hypothesis is informed by prior knowledge about the subject
  • Multiple hypotheses that test different aspects of the subject
  • During the lab/project, developing new hypotheses as you learn new information

Planning and conducting

  • Collaboratively and individually plan, select, and use appropriate investigation methods, including field work and lab experiments, to collect reliable data (qualitative and quantitative)
  • Assess risks and address ethical, cultural, and/or environmental issues associated with their proposed methods
  • Use appropriate SI units and appropriate equipment, including digital technologies, to systematically and accurately collect and record data
  • Apply the concepts of accuracy and precision to experimental procedures and data (significant figures, uncertainty, scientific notation)

How can this skill be demonstrated?

  • Making sure to collect both quantitative (numbers) and qualitative (observations) during labs and projects
  • By designing well-controlled science experiments

What does extending look like?

  • Not making mistakes with significant figures, units, and including directions for vectors
  • Using the most accurate and precise measurement tool possible
  • Averaging multiple trials to get more accurate results (Isaac Newton)
  • Designed experiments isolate the variable(s) of interest properly

Processing and analyzing data and information

  • Experience and interpret the local environment
  • Apply First Peoples perspectives and knowledge, other ways of knowing, and local knowledge as sources of information
  • Seek and analyze patterns, trends, and connections in data, including describing relationships between variables, performing calculations, and identifying inconsistencies
  • Construct, analyze, and interpret graphs, models, and/or diagrams
  • Use knowledge of scientific concepts to draw conclusions that are consistent with evidence
  • Analyze cause-and-effect relationships
How can this skill be demonstrated?
  • Using graphs when appropriate, with proper labels and trendlines if needed
  • Using significant figures and units properly, and including directions for vectors
What does extending look like?
  • Averaging multiple trials to get more accurate results
  • Making strong links between the theoretical (equations, etc.) and the practical (real-world applications)
  • Draw high quality conclusions from the data

Evaluating

  • Evaluate their methods and experimental conditions, including identifying sources of error or uncertainty, confounding variables, and possible alternative explanations and conclusions
  • Describe specific ways to improve their investigation methods and the quality of their data
  • Evaluate the validity and limitations of a model or analogy in relation to the phenomenon modelled
  • Demonstrate an awareness of assumptions, question information given, and identify bias in their own work and in primary and secondary sources
  • Consider the changes in knowledge over time as tools and technologies have developed
  • Connect scientific explorations to careers in science
  • Exercise a healthy, informed skepticism and use scientific knowledge and findings to form their own investigations to evaluate claims in primary and secondary sources
  • Consider social, ethical, and environmental implications of the findings from their own and others’ investigations
  • Critically analyze the validity of information in primary and secondary sources and evaluate the approaches used to solve problems
  • Assess risks in the context of personal safety and social responsibility

How can this skill be demonstrated?

  • b

What does extending look like?

  • b

Applying and innovating

  • Contribute to care for self, others, community, and world through individual or collaborative approaches
  • Co-operatively design projects with local and/or global connections and applications
  • Contribute to finding solutions to problems at a local and/or global level through inquiry
  • Implement multiple strategies to solve problems in real-life, applied, and conceptual situations
  • Consider the role of scientists in innovation

Communicating

  • Formulate physical or mental theoretical models to describe a phenomenon
  • Communicate scientific ideas and information, and perhaps a suggested course of action, for a specific purpose and audience, constructing evidence-based arguments and using appropriate scientific language, conventions, and representations
  • Express and reflect on a variety of experiences, perspectives, and worldviews through place